Comma After “Also” – Rules, Examples & Practice Sheet

06.04.24 Commas Time to read: 6min

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The proper use of commas in academic writing is crucial to remain concise and coherent and to enable an easier understanding. However, students often have difficulty understanding comma rules due to a lack of in-depth knowledge and quantity of comma rules. In this article, we will furnish examples, and a practice sheet, and determine whether a comma should be utilized after the phrase “also.”

When to place a comma after “also”

The word “also” is grammatically classified as an adverb in the English language. An adverb is a part of speech used to modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs, often describing how, when, where, why, or to what extent an action is performed.

In the case of “also,” it is used to add information to a sentence, usually indicating that something is in addition to what has already been stated.

Comma

Conjunctive adverb

 

 

No Comma

After conjunction

End or middle word

Adverbial complement

Comma rules may vary depending on different Style Guides. Some writers prefer to use more commas to clarify the meaning of a sentence, while others prefer to use fewer commas to create a more streamlined and concise sentence. Ultimately, it’s important to keep in mind whether your sentence is easy to read and clear, even without the use of a comma.

Comma after “also”

There is one condition for when you use a comma after “also” which is when you use it as a conjunctive adverb. This can either occur at the beginning of a sentence or between two separate sentences that are linked together by a semicolon.

Conjunctive adverb

A comma is typically used after conjunctive adverbs when they begin a freestanding sentence, or tie up two independent clauses. Conjunctive adverbs are words like, however, moreover, therefore, consequently, otherwise, then, likewise, and also, which are used to create a smooth transition between sentences or between independent clauses within a sentence.

They serve to clarify the relationship between those clauses or sentences, such as contrast, cause and effect, or addition. Therefore, this rule applies to “also” every single time it acts as an adverbial connector. They are often followed by a comma when they introduce a clause, and can be linked by a semicolon when they come between independent clauses.

Examples

  • We plan to expand our services to new cities; also, we will introduce online consultations.
  • He finished his homework on time. Also, he decided to review for the upcoming test.
  • Also, she plans to start a new project next month.

No comma after “also”

There are three cases for when you don’t use a comma after “also.” When it follows a conjunction, or adds or emphasizes an addition or information at the end or middle of a sentence. It also cannot be omitted, when it plays a significant role in the meaning of a sentence.

After conjunction

“Also” can serve as a way to add information or connect ideas. Its use without a comma after a conjunction, for example, is generally acceptable in cases where the adverb “also” directly modifies the verb or action that comes after it. A comma before the conjunction, however, is not mandatory. It can be used to suggest a pause.

Examples

  • She writes novels and also teaches writing workshops.
  • He enjoys painting and also collects art from around the world.
  • I am interested in music and also enjoy playing the cello.

End or middle word

When “also” is used at the end or in the middle of a sentence, a comma is not necessary. It adds information or emphasizes an addition, and it concludes the sentence naturally without the need for a preceding comma.

Examples

  • She enjoys painting and sculpting. She teaches music classes on weekends also.
  • He’s an excellent cook. He also bakes amazing cakes.
  • They’ve traveled to Italy and France. Next year, they plan to visit Spain also.

Adverbial complement

Adverbial complements are words, phrases, or clauses that are significant to the meaning of a sentence. When taking away the information, the meaning of the sentence would be incomplete and difficult to understand. If we use “also” as a part of an adverbial complement, a comma is not needed.

Examples

  • Unfortunately, their children were also on the submarine.
  • Please put the mug also on the shelf.
  • The teacher also sent Melanie home.

Test yourself!

Practice sheet

You can check your understanding of using commas after “also” by taking this test. The solutions can be found in the second tab.

  1. I did not like the shirt that much. ____ it was too expensive.
  2. He promised to call; ____ he said he would send an email.
  3. I plan to visit Paris, and I ____  want to explore the countryside.
  4. We should consider its impact. ____ the cost needs to be discussed.
  5. The project was a success. It was ____ a learning experience for everyone involved.
  6. He plays football professionally; and ____ coaches a local youth team.
  7. They plan to renovate the kitchen and ____ the bathroom.
  8. She practices yoga regularly. ____  she meditates every morning.
  9. She’s an author, and ____ an accomplished musician.
  10. Our software not only saves time, but ____ increases efficiency.
    1. I did not like the shirt that much. Also, ⁣it was too expensive. (Comma)
    2. He promised to call; also, he said he would send an email. (Comma)
    3. I plan to visit Paris, and I also want to explore the countryside. (No comma)
    4. We should consider its impact. Also, the cost needs to be discussed. (Comma)
    5. The project was a success. It was also a learning experience for everyone involved. (No comma)
    6. He plays football professionally; and also, ⁣coaches a local youth team. (Comma)
    7. They plan to renovate the kitchen and also the bathroom. (No comma)
    8. She practices yoga regularly. Also, she meditates every morning. (Comma)
    9. She’s an author, and also an accomplished musician. (No comma)
    10. Our software not only saves time, but also increases efficiency. (No comma)
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FAQs

There is one condition for when you use a comma after “also” which is when you use it as a conjunctive adverb. They are used to create a smooth transition between sentences or between independent clauses within a sentence.

This can happen at the beginning of a sentence or between two sentences that connect with a semicolon.

No, there is no punctuation needed before and after “also known as,” unless you use it as a parenthetical element or clarification.

Examples

  • The renowned artist is also known as Prince.
  • The city of New York, also known as the Big Apple, is famous for its vibrant energy.

“Not only…but also” works as a set and there is no rule that necessitates a comma, and thus putting one between this pair is often unnecessary. You use the comma only if “not only…but also” is linking two lengthy independent clauses rather than two relatively simple sentence parts.

If you want to know more about this subject. Take a look at our other article about a “comma with “not only…but also””.