Manoeuvre Or Maneuver – British vs. American English

13.05.24 British English vs. American English Time to read: 4min

How do you like this article?

0 Reviews


Manoeuvre-or-maneuver-01

Over time, the English language has developed distinct varieties of pronunciation and spelling. Especially in academic writing, it is crucial to uphold linguistic consistency and ensure a coherent flow to keep academic integrity. British English vs. American English poses a highly noteworthy case, with a noticeable difference in spelling. This article delves into the specific instance of “manoeuvre” or “maneuver,” highlighting common patterns in these dialects.

“Manoeuvre” or “maneuver”

“Manoeuvre” and “maneuver” can both function as nouns or as verbs, spelled in different English variations. As a noun, it refers to a carefully planned or skillful move or series of moves, often carried out to achieve a specific end. It can be used in both a physical and metaphorical sense, such as in military strategies, sports, or any situation requiring tactical planning.

As a verb, “maneuver” means to skillfully or carefully move or guide someone or something into a desired position. It also encompasses the act of manipulating situations or navigating through them with skill and tact to achieve a particular outcome or advantage.

While the British English version follows the spelling of its French derived noun “manoeuvre,” the American English version sticks to the simpler spelling reform of just using “-euver” at the end instead of “-oeuvre.”

Manoeuvre-or-maneuver-UK-flag

British English

manoeuvre

Manoeuvre-or-maneuver-US-flag

American English

maneuver

Both spellings are correct; however, in British English, the more common spelling is “manoeuvre.” In American English, the more common spelling is “maneuver.” Regardless of the dialect chosen for your academic work, it is imperative to maintain consistency in your spelling in order to prevent any potential impact on academic integrity and credibility.

Examples of using “manoeuvre” and “maneuver” as a noun

The following examples will illustrate the difference in the spelling of the noun “manoeuvre/maneuver” in British and American English.

  • British English: “Manoeuvre”
  • American English: “Maneuver”
Manoeuvre-or-maneuver-noun-Uk-Flag
  • The military manoeuvre was executed with precision.
  • That chess manoeuvre caught his opponent off guard.
  • The emergency manoeuvre saved lives during the evacuation.
Manoeuvre-or-maneuver-noun-US-flag
  • The military maneuver was executed with precision.
  • That chess maneuver caught his opponent off guard.
  • The emergency maneuver saved lives during the evacuation.

Examples of using “manouevre” and “maneuver” as a verb

The following examples will illustrate the difference in the spelling of the verb “manoevure/maneuver” in British and American English.

  • British English: “To manoeuvre”
  • American English: “To maneuver”
Manoeuvre-or-maneuver-verb-UK-Flag
  • The team manoeuvres the equipment into position.
  • We’ll need to manoeuvre carefully to win this negotiation.
  • The ship manoeuvres into the dock amid the fog.
Manoeuvre-or-maneuver-verb-US-Flag
  • The team maneuvers the equipment into position.
  • We’ll need to maneuver carefully to win this negotiation.
  • The ship maneuvers into the dock amid the fog.

“Manoeuvre” or “maneuver” in the “-ed” form

The “-ed” inflection of the verb “to manoeuvre/maneuver” indicates the past tense or past participle of the word. Below, you’ll find an overview with examples.

  • British English: “Manoeuvred”
  • American English: “Maneuvered”
Manoeuvre-or-maneuver-ed-form-UK-flag
  • The skilled pilot manoeuvred the aircraft through a turbulent storm.
  • He manoeuvred the chess pieces deftly to secure a checkmate.
  • The spy manoeuvred through the laser grid undetected.
Manoeuvre-or-maneuver-ed-form-US-flag
  • The skilled pilot maneuvered the aircraft through a turbulent storm.
  • He maneuvered the chess pieces deftly to secure a checkmate.
  • The spy maneuvered through the laser grid undetected.

“Manoeuvre” or “maneuver” in the “-ing” form

When the verb “to manoeuvre/maneuver” is inflected in the “-ing” form, it implies the present participle or a gerund. Following the respective spelling conventions of British English and American English, the different variants are outlined below.

  • British English: “Manoeuvring”
  • American English: “Maneuvering”
Manoeuvre-or-maneuver-ing-form-UK-flag
  • Manoeuvring through the crowded market requires skill.
  • The art of manoeuvring a sailboat against the wind is fascinating.
  • Manoeuvring in tight spaces was her specialty.
Manoeuvre-or-maneuver-ing-form-US-flag
  • Maneuvering through the crowded market requires skill.
  • The art of maneuvering a sailboat against the wind is fascinating.
  • Maneuvering in tight spaces was her specialty.

FAQs

“Maneuver” and “manoeuvre” refer to the same concept of a skillful or strategic move, but the difference in spelling reflects the variation between American English (“maneuver”) and British English (“manoeuvre”). Essentially, “maneuver” is used in the United States, while “manoeuvre” is preferred in the UK, Canada, Australia, and other countries using British spelling conventions.

“Manoeuvre” refers to a carefully planned or skillful move, action, or series of moves, either physically, as in a military or naval operation, or metaphorically, in a strategic or tactical context. It can be used as both a noun and a verb, denoting the action itself or the act of performing such an action.

Synonyms for “manoeuvre/maneuver “ include strategy, tactic, move, operation, plan, ploy, ruse, and scheme. These words refer to planned or skillful actions or strategies designed to achieve a specific outcome or advantage, often used in contexts ranging from military operations to everyday situations requiring tact or skill.

In the US, “maneuverability” is spelled with an “e” before the “u” – as “maneuverability.” This follows the American spelling convention of using “maneuver” instead of the British “manoeuvre.”

Design and print your thesis!
Our printing services at BachelorPrint offer US students a practical and cost-effective way for printing and binding their theses. Starting at just $ 7.90 and FREE express shipping, you can sit back and feel confident.