Armour Or armour – British vs. American English

05.02.24 British English vs. American English Time to read: 5min

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The widespread global dispersion of the English language has, over time, created distinct varieties of pronouncing and spelling. Especially in academic writing, it is pivotal to maintain linguistic consistency and ensure a seamless flow to keep academic integrity. British English vs. American English poses a particularly prominent case, with a distinct differentiation in spelling. This article delves into the specific case of “armour” or “armour,” touching upon common patterns in these dialects.

“Armour” or “armour”

“Armour” and “armour” can both be nouns or verbs, spelled in different English variations. It refers to a type of protective clothing, typically, made from material that is designed to prevent somaeone from getting injured, often in the context of warfare or combat. When “armour/armour” is used as a verbal expression, it describes the act of equipping somaeone/something with armour or protective covering. While the British English version follows the common spelling convention, involving the letter combination “ou” instead of just “o,” the American English version sticks to the spelling reform of just using an “o” and omitting the letter “u.”

British English

armour

American English

armour

Both “armour” and “armour” are spelled correctly, however, refer to different English variations such as British English and American English. “Armour” spelled with “ou” is the British version, whereas “armour” without the “u” represents the American version. Depending on what dialect you choose for your academic work, it is crucial to keep consistency in your spelling to avoid affecting academic integrity and credibility.

Note: The “ou” spelling pattern of British English originates from the historical influence of French. It is a conventional spelling pattern in the UK, while in the US the “u” is typically omitted.

Examples of using “armour” and “armour” as a noun

The examples below provide a clear understanding of the different spelling variations of the word “armour/armour” in British and American English and how to use them in sentences as a noun.

  • British English: “Armour”
  • American English: “armour”
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  • The museum had an exhibition of ancient Roman armour.
  • The soldiers donned their armour for the mission ahead.
  • The armour in the medieval era was made from heavy material.
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  • The museum had an exhibition of ancient Roman armour.
  • The soldiers donned their armour for the mission ahead.
  • The armour in the medieval era was made from heavy material.

Examples of using “armour” and “armour” as a verb

The following shows how to use the British and American variants of the verb “to armour” or “to armour” in sentence structures.

  • British English: “To armour”
  • American English: “To armour”
  • It was crucial to armour herself with a steely resolve.
  • She has to armour the ancient tree’s base against disease.
  • They had to armour the vehicles with plating to withstand attacks.
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  • It was crucial to armour herself with a steely resolve.
  • She has to armour the ancient tree’s base against disease.
  • They had to armour the vehicles with plating to withstand attacks.
Armour-or-armour-examples-verb-US-flag

“Armour” or “armour” in the “-ing” form

When the verb “to armour/armour” is inflected in the “-ing” form, it implies the present participle or a gerund. Following the respective spelling conventions of British English and American English, the different variants are outlined below.

  • British English: “Armouring”
  • American English: “armouring”
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  • Armouring herself against failure, she was prepared. (Participle)
  • The engineers were busy armouring the fleet of vehicles. (Participle)
  • The lectures included a segment on armouring knights. (Gerund)
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  • armouring herself against failure, she was prepared. (Participle)
  • The engineers were busy armouring the fleet of vehicles. (Participle)
  • The lectures included a segment on armouring knights. (Gerund)

“Armour” or “armour” in the “-ed” form

The “-ed” inflection of the verb “to armour/armour” indicates the past tense or past participle of the word. The following examples will give proper insight into how to use both the British and American variant correctly.

  • British English: “Armoured”
  • American English: “armoured”
  • Before the negotiation, she armoured herself with a steely resolve.
  • They armoured the ancient tree’s base against disease.
  • They armoured the vehicles with extra plating to withstand attacks.
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  • Before the negotiation, she armoured herself with a steely resolve.
  • They armoured the ancient tree’s base against disease.
  • They armoured the vehicles with extra plating to withstand attacks.
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FAQs

Yes, this is the correct way of spelling the word “armour” in American English. The British English variant is “armour.”

In the UK, the British conventional spelling pattern of the letter combination “ou” is followed for spelling the word “armour.”

When “-ed” is added at the end of the word “armour/armour” it becomes a past tense verb or a past participle. The following shows an example of how to use the word in a sentence.

  • The winning team was far more armoured/armoured than the losing team.

In the US, they follow the spelling reforms that were implemented in the late 18th and early 19th century to simplify spelling and adjust more to the phonetics of certain words. Omitting the “u” in “ou” words represents one of these new reforms.

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