Chicago Style Lecture Citation – Format With Examples

08.02.23 Chicago style examples Time to read: 3min

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Chicago-Style-Lecture-Citation-Definition

The Chicago Manual of Style provides a specific framework for citing sources. When referencing a lecture, it typically autumns under the category of “non-concurrent” or “unpublished” sources. According to the Chicago style, you need to include the speaker’s name, the title of the lecture in quotation marks (or a description if there’s no formal title), the event’s name, its location, and the date of the lecture. The citation structure varies depending on whether it’s included in the bibliography or used as an in-text citation. Discover more details in this article.

Chicago Style Lecture Citation – In a Nutshell

  • Chicago style lecture citations can be in note and bibliography or the author-date style.
  • In the notes and bibliography system, in-text citations are noted with a superscript
  • The superscripts refer to a footnote at the bottom of the page.
  • The format of Chicago style lecture citation depends on how you accessed it.
  • If it’s a recorded speech, you follow the appropriate citation format of the source.
  • If you viewed the lecture in person, provide information on where and when it took place.

Definition: Chicago style lecture citation

Chicago style lecture citation requires using footnotes for in-text citations and a list of entries in the bibliography. Since you are citing lectures or speeches, you need to describe the media. For a lecture in a classroom, writers must include the lecturer’s name, title, lecture, event, location, and date.

Example

General Format Example
Chicago bibliography: Lecturer last name, first name. “Title.” Lecture, Institution/event, location, month day, Year. Jordan, Stephen. “The Role of Female Doctors in Crimean War.” Lecture, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, January 12, 2020.
Full note: First name last name, “title” (lecture, institution, location, month date, year). Stephen Jordan, “The Role of Female Doctors in Crimean War” (lecture, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, January 12, 2020).
Short note: Last name, “shortened title.” Jordan, “Doctors in Crimean War.”
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Chicago style lecture citation: Examples

Example

General Format Example
Chicago bibliography: Lecturer last name, first name. “Title.” Lecture, Institution/event, location, month day, Year. Elton, James. “The Effects of the Russian Civil War.” Lecture, New York University, New York, NY, March 19, 2014.
Full note: First name last name, “title” (lecture, institution, location, month date, year). James Elton, “The Effects of the Russian Civil War” (lecture, New York University, New York, NY, March 19, 2014).
Short note: Lecturer’s last name, “Shortened title.” Elton, “Russian Civil War.”

Chicago style lecture citation: Google Slides, PowerPoint, etc.

When using Chicago style lecture citation to cite information in a PowerPoint presentation or Google slides, ensure you include the media. Here are the examples:

Example

General Format Example
Chicago bibliography: Last name, first name. “Lecture or presentation title.” Powerpoint presentation, university or conference name, location, month date, Year of presentation. Roberts, Norah. “Importance of Fish in the Ecosystem.” Powerpoint presentation, University of Dallas, Texas, June 9, 2018.
Full note: First name last name, “Presentation title” (Powerpoint presentation, conference or university name, location, month day, Year). Norah Roberts, “Importance of Fish in the Ecosystem.”(Powerpoint presentation, university of Dallas, Texas, June 9, 2018).
Short note: Last name, “Shortened title.” Roberts, “Fish in the Ecosystem.”

Chicago style lecture citation: Transcription

When citing a transcribed speech using the Chicago style lecture citation, follow the format appropriate to the source, starting with the speaker’s name. A transcript on a book will have publisher details, while a transcript on a website will have a URL.

Example

General Format Example
Chicago bibliography: Author’s last name, first name. “Speech title.” In Book Title: Subtitle, edited by editor first name last name, page range. Place of publication: publisher, Year. Smith, John. “The Effects of Depression.” In The Penguin Book of Modern Speeches, edited by Theodore Roosevelt, 6-10. Birmingham: Penguin, 2016.
Full note: Author first name last name, “Speech Title,” In Book title: subtitle, ed. Editor’s first name and last name (Place of publication: Publisher, the year), page number. John Smith, “The Effects of Depression,” in The Penguin Book of Modern Speeches, ed. Theodore Roosevelt(Birmingham: Penguin, 2016), 7.
Short note: Speaker last name, “shortened title,” page number. Smith, "Effects of Depression, "7.

Chicago style lecture citation: Recording

Using Chicago style lecture citations for recording uses the same format as the transcription.

Example

General Format Example
Chicago bibliography: Speaker's last name, first name. "Speech Title." Recorded at location, month day, Year. Luther Martin. “I have a Dream” Recorded at Lincoln, Washington, September 28, 1970.
Full note: Speaker first name last name, "speech title," recorded at location, month day, Year, timestamp. Martin Luther, “I have a Dream” Lincoln, September 28, 1970, 8:15.
Short note: Speaker last name, “shortened title,” timestamp Luther, “I have a Dream,” 8:15.

Chicago style lecture citation: No date

When you are citing the Chicago style lecture citation and there is no date listed for the lecture you reference, use the initials n.d. instead.

Example

Elton, James. “The Effects of the Russian Civil War.” Lecture, New York University, New York, NY, n.d.

Chicago style lecture citation: No author

When the author or the lecturer isn’t listed in Chicago style lecture citation, start the citation with the lecture or speech title. As shown below:

Example

“The Effects of the Russian Civil War.” Lecture, New York University, New York, NY, March 19, 2014.

Chicago style lecture citation: Author-date style

In Chicago style lecture citation, you can cite speeches, transcribed speeches and recorded lectures using the author-date style. The reference list entries are similar to the bibliography format except for the Year. Here are examples:

Lecture citation Lecture delivered via Google Slides, PowerPoint, etc. Transcribed lecture Recorded lecture
Chicago author-date format Speaker's last name, first name. Year. "Lecture title." Lecture, Institution name, location, month day, year. Last name, first name. Year. “Lecture or presentation title.” PowerPoint presentation, university or conference name, location, month date, Year of presentation. Author’s last name, first name. Year. “Speech title.” In Book Title: Subtitle, edited by editor first name last name, page range. Place of publication: publisher, Year. Speaker's last name, first name. Year. "Speech Title." Recorded at location, month day, Year.
Chicago reference entry Elton, James. 2014. “The Effects of the Russian Civil War.” Lecture, New York University, New York, NY, March 19, 2014. Roberts, Norah. 2018. “Importance of Fish in the Ecosystem.” PowerPoint presentation, University of Dallas, Texas, June 9, 2018. Smith, John. 2016. “The Effects of Depression.” In The Penguin Book of Modern Speeches, edited by Theodore Roosevelt, 6-10. Birmingham: Penguin, 2016. Luther Martin. 1970. “I have a Dream” Recorded at Lincoln, Washington, September 28, 1970.
Chicago author-date citation (Elton 2014) (Roberts 2018) (Smith 2016) (Luther 1970)

FAQs

When you are citing a recorded speech in Chicago style lecture citation, you must mention the place of recording and the website it was posted.

If the date is not listed, list n.d. in place of the date when you create a reference list using the Chicago style citation for lecture.

You can start with the speech title and stick to the bibliography or author-date format in Chicago lecture citation.