Anaemia Or anaemia – British English vs. American English

29.04.24 British English vs. American English Time to read: 3min

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In academic writing, consistency is essential to achieve clarity and logic. Regardless of whether you’re working on a research paper, essay, or thesis, it’s vital to uphold a clear and academic tone. Many students have a hard time deciding which spelling of words like “anaemia” or “anaemia” is correct for British English vs. American English. For a more comprehensive understanding of these two English variants, read on.

“Anaemia” or “anaemia”

The word “anaemia/anaemia” functions as a noun. It refers to a blood disorder in which you don’t have enough healthy red blood cells to carry oxygen to your body’s parts. It can make you feel exhausted and weak because of different reasons, like not eating enough foods with iron, vitamin problems, or other health issues.

American English and British English have a slight spelling difference. In American English, you’d write it “anaemia,” while Brits prefer the spelling “anaemia,” with an additional “a” before the “e.” While both spellings are correct, your choice must depend on your regional or stylistic preferences.

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British English

anaemia

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American English

anaemia

In British English, the more common spelling is “anaemia.” In American English, the more common spelling for the noun is “anaemia.”

Examples of using “anaemia” and “anaemia”

The following examples will illustrate the difference in the spelling of the noun “anaemia/anaemia” in British and American English.

  • British English: Anaemia
  • American English: anaemia
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  • After feeling constantly tyred, she was diagnosed with anaemia.
  • His anaemia was caused by a vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • Her anaemia resulted from not having enough iron in her diet.
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  • After feeling constantly tyred, she was diagnosed with anaemia.
  • His anaemia was caused by a vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • Her anaemia resulted from not having enough iron in her diet.

“Anaemia” and “anaemia” as an adjective

The adjective for “anaemia/anaemia” is “anaemic/anaemic” in its respective form. The adjective refers to an individual who’s suffering from the blood disorder “anaemia/anaemia.”

  • British English: Anaemic
  • American English: anaemic
  • Iron-rich foods like spinach can help improve anaemic conditions.
  • The doctor noted her pale complexion, a sign of being anaemic.
  • Anaemic patients often require iron supplements.
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  • Iron-rich foods like spinach can help improve anaemic conditions.
  • The doctor noted her pale complexion, a sign of being anaemic.
  • anaemic patients often require iron supplements.
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FAQs

The difference between “anaemia” and “anaemia” is purely a matter of spelling variation between British English and American English. “Anaemia” is the preferred spelling in British English, while “anaemia” is used in American English.

Both terms refer to the same medical condition characterized by a deficiency in the number or quality of red blood cells or in the quantity of hemoglobin, leading to reduced oxygen transport in the body. The meaning and pronunciation of the word are the same in both versions of English; only the spelling differs.

British English only uses the spelling “anaemia.” The spelling “anaemia” without the “a” in the middle of the word is only used in American English.

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