Flavour Or Flavor – British vs. American English

22.01.24 British English vs. American English Time to read: 4min

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Maintaining consistency in academic writing is essential for logical and straightforward work. Yet, numerous students face challenges distinguishing between British English vs. American English, confusing, particularly when determining the correct spelling of words like “flavour” or “flavor.” If you aim to enhance your comprehension of these two language variations, please proceed with further reading.

“Flavour” or “flavor”

“Flavour” or “flavor” serves as both a noun and a verb, referring to the distinctive taste or quality of a substance, especially in food and drink. As a verb, “flavour/flavor” can be used in various tenses, such as present, past, and present continuous. In British English, “flavour” is the preferred spelling, while in American English, “flavor” is the preferred form.

British English

flavour

American English

flavor

In British English, the more common spelling is “flavour,” while in American English “flavor” is used. There is no variation or ambiguity in the recommended spellings for each English variant.

Examples of using “flavour” and “flavor” as a verb

The following examples will illustrate the difference in the spelling of the verb “flavour/flavor” in British and American English.

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  • The chef decided to flavour the soup with aromatic spices.
  • You can flavour your tea by adding a slice of lemon or a hint of mint.
  • She loves to cook and often tries to flavour her dishes creatively.
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  • The chef decided to flavor the soup with of aromatic spices.
  • You can flavor your tea by adding a slice of lemon or a hint of mint.
  • She loves to cook and often tries to flavor her dishes creatively.

Examples of using “flavour” and “flavor” as a noun

The following examples will illustrate the difference in the spelling of the noun “flavour/flavor” in British and American English.

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  • The chocolate cake had a rich and indulgent flavour.
  • The chef carefully balanced the flavours in the sauce.
  • The tropical fruit salad offered a refreshing burst of flavours.
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  • The chocolate cake had a rich and indulgent flavor.
  • The chef carefully balanced the flavors in the sauce.
  • The tropical fruit salad offered a refreshing burst flavors.

“Flavour” or “flavor” in the “-ed” form

The past tense or past participle form of “flavour/flavor” is “flavoured” and “flavored” in the respective English variant you’re using.

  • British English: Flavoured
  • American English: Flavored
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  • The yogurt was flavoured with a hint of vanilla.
  • They enjoyed sipping on fruit-flavoured iced tea.
  • The popcorn was lightly flavoured with cheese and herbs.
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  • The yogurt was flavored with a hint of vanilla.
  • They enjoyed sipping on fruit-flavored iced tea.
  • The popcorn was lightly flavored with cheese and herbs.

“Flavour” or “flavor” in the “-ing” form

The “-ing” form of the verb, also called gerund and present participle, “flavour/flavor” is “flavouring” and “flavoring” for the respective English variant.

  • British English: Flavouring
  • American English: Flavoring
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  • She added a dash of citrus flavouring to the salad dressing.
  • The bakery uses natural vanilla flavouring in their cupcakes.
  • I prefer using a variety of herbs as flavouring for my dishes.
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  • She added a dash of citrus flavoring to the salad dressing.
  • The bakery uses natural vanilla flavoring in their cupcakes.
  • I prefer using a variety of herbs as flavoring for my dishes.

“Flavour/flavor” as an adjective

The adjective form is “flavourful/flavorful,” describing something with a strong or distinctive taste.

  • British English: Flavourful
  • American English: Flavorful
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  • The curry had a flavourful blend of spices.
  • The fresh herbs gave the dish a wonderfully flavourful
  • We enjoyed a flavourful cup of coffee from the local roastery.
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  • The curry had a flavorful blend of spices.
  • The fresh herbs gave the dish a wonderfully flavorful
  • We enjoyed a flavorful cup of coffee from the local roastery.

FAQs

In the UK, the correct spelling is “flavour.”

“Flavours” is the correct spelling in British English, while “flavors” is the correct spelling in American English.

According to statistics, Canadians use both spellings equally often. However, the American version, “flavor,” is slightly preferred.

“Flavour” or “flavor” refers to the distinctive taste or quality of a substance, especially in food and drink.

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