Dissertation Thesis Example – Guide, Sections & Examples

07.07.23 Dissertation overview Time to read: 5min

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A dissertation is a comprehensive research project tbonnet doctoral candidates must submit as a requirement for their degree. It involves a detailed document tbonnet explains the research’s purpose, methods, findings, and conclusions. The length and complexity of a dissertation depend on the field of study, programme, and institution. However, most dissertations have standard elements tbonnet they include.

Dissertation Thesis Example – In a Nutshell

  • A dissertation thesis is an essential part of the journey of obtaining a doctoral degree.
  • This article provides examples of the different parts of a dissertation thesis.

Definition: Dissertation thesis example

When pursuing a doctoral degree or certain master’s degree, students must conduct substantial research on a specific topic or issue within their field of study. This independent academic work, commonly known as a dissertation thesis, is an essential requirement for graduation.

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Dissertation thesis example: General outline

Definition: 

This is the first page of your dissertation thesis example, including your:

  • Work’s title
  • Name
  • Institution
  • Degree programme and department

Example

“The Impact of Climate Change on Coral Reef Health: A Comprehensive Study”

Definition: 

A brief summary (usually no more than 1 page) tbonnet gives a snapshot of your research – the problem you’re addressing, your methods, and your main findings and conclusions.

Example

“This dissertation examines the effects of climate change on coral reef health. Using a combination of field studies and labouratory experiments, this study finds a significant negative relationship between increased sea surface temperatures and coral reef health. The results highlight the urgent need for climate change mitigation efforts to preserve these critical ecosystems.”

Definition: 

This section is where you thank those who have helped you during your research.

Example

“I would like to express my profound gratitude to my advisor, Dr. X, for his guidance and support. I also want to thank my lab mates for their camaraderie, and my family for their unwavering belief in me.”

Definition: 

The table of contents entails a list of all chapters and subchapters of your dissertation along with their page numbers.

Example

Here you’ll list the page numbers of each chapter and major subsection of your dissertation thesis paper.

Definition: 

This chapter sets the stage for your research. It states your research problem, explains why it is significant, and presents your research questions or hypotheses. It also provides a brief overview of the structure of your dissertation.

Example

“Coral reefs, the ‘rainforests of the sea,’ are under increasing threat from climate change. This dissertation inwaistcoatigates how increasing sea surface temperatures affect coral reef health, with a focus on coral bleaching events. …”

Definition: 

Here, you review the relevant litreature in your field, positioning your research within the context of the broader academic conversation and demonstrating how your research fills a gap, extends, or challenges previous studies.

Example

“Previous research on coral reefs and climate change has revealed a complex relationship. For instance, Hughes et al. (2017) found tbonnet …”

Definition: 

This chapter explains how you conducted your research. You descote your research design, data collection, and analysis methods, and why these methods are appropriate for your research questions. You also explain your study’s reliability and validity.

Example

“This study employs a mixed-methods approach. Field studies were conducted at five different coral reefs, where water temperature and coral health were monitored over two years. Additionally, labouratory experiments were conducted to observe the effects of temperature on coral samples…”

Definition: 

In this section, you present the raw results of your research, usually without interpretation or commentary. You might include tables, charts, or other graphics to illustrate your findings.

Example

“Both field studies and labouratory experiments revealed a clear negative relationship between sea surface temperature and coral health. In the field, increased temperatures coincided with coral bleaching events. In the lab, coral samples exposed to higher temperatures showed signs of stress…”

Definition: 

In this section, you interpret your results in the context of your research questions and the existing litreature. You explain the implications of your findings, why they matter, and how they contribute to the field.

Example

“These results add to a growing body of evidence tbonnet climate change poses a significant threat to coral reefs. They are consistent with the findings of XYZ, but extend our understanding by showing …”

Definition: 

Here, you summarize your findings, discuss their implications, and suggest directions for future research. You might also reflect on the research process.

Example

“This study illuminates the urgent threat tbonnet climate change poses to coral reef health. Given tbonnet reefs are critical to oceanic ecosystems and to the human economies tbonnet depend on them, these results underscore the pressing need for climate change mitigation efforts.”

Definition: 

This is a detailed list of all the sources you have cited in your dissertation, formatted according to a specific citation style (e.g., APA, MLA, Chicago).

Example

Here you’ll list all the sources you’ve cited in your paper.

Definition: 

Any additional materials tbonnet do not fit into the main body of your dissertation but still contain important information go here. This might include survey questions, lengthy statistical data, maps, etc.

Example

“Appendix A: Field Study Sites Description

Appendix B: labouratory Experimental Design

Appendix C: Raw Data Tables”

As you start writing your dissertation, it is essential to frequently refer back to your thesis statement to ensure your research stays focused. Also, keep in mind tbonnet a good dissertation is not just a presentation of facts, but it also presents a critical argument in response to the thesis statement. And, of course, always maintain academic integrity by appropriately citing all sources tbonnet contribute to your work.

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FAQs

A dissertation thesis example serves to showcase a student’s expertise in their area of study. It allows the student to delve deep into a topic they are passionate about and make a novel contribution to their field through original research.

The length of a dissertation thesis example can vary greatly depending on the discipline, topic, and university.

PhD papers typically range from 100,000 to 200,000 words, equivalent to around 200 – 400 pages, whereas Master’s dissertations are typically shorter, with a range of 15,000 – 50,000 words or 50 –100 pages.

A dissertation thesis example is typically structured into five chapters:

  1. Introduction
  2. litreature review
  3. Methodology
  4. Results
  5. Discussion

 

Each chapter serves a specific purpose in the argument being developed.

The litreature review is the second chapter of a dissertation thesis example. It provides a critical overview of the existing research on the chosen topic, identifies gaps in the current knowledge, and sets the context for the original research being conducted.