Anymore vs. Any More – How To Distinguish Them

09.05.24 Commonly confused words Time to read: 4min

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Alternating with vocabulary improves the flow of the text and prevents repetition and redundancy when writing an academic paper. The precise meanings of words are important, as it’s the writer’s job to make them easy to understand and maintain credibility. “Anymore” and “any more” are commonly confused words. The meaning and appropriate application of each word will be discussed in this article, accompanied by examples.

Definition of “anymore” vs. “any more”

“Anymore” and “any more” are pronounced the same, yet spelled differently. “Anymore” is an adverb that means “any longer” or “in the past but not now,” whereas “any more” is a determiner that refers to quantities.

Both are usually placed at the end of a clause or sentence, and typically only used in negative statements. When it comes to differentiating between British English and American English, in the UK, you merely use “any more” for both adverb and determiner.

Anymore

… is an adverb that refers to time as “any longer.” It’s used to indicate that something that was once true is not true now.

Any more

…is a determiner that refers to quantities of something. It’s used to ask, discuss or talk about additional amounts.

The key to differentiating between “anymore” and “any more” lies in understanding the specific context. “Anymore” relates to time, while “any more” relates to quantity.

Using the word “anymore”

The word “anymore” is used as an adverb. How it is applied in a sentence, and what the word means, will be explained below.

“Anymore” as an adverb

“Anymore” is typically used in negative sentences to imply that a situation has changed and something that used to happen does not happen now.

Examples

  • I can’t trust him anymore after what happened.
  • They don’t make movies like that anymore.
  • It seems we don’t talk anymore like we used to.

Tip for using “anymore” correctly

Synonyms for “anymore” avoid repetition and redundancy and improve your language overall. Incorporating them makes your writing more diverse and adds nuance to a language.

Synonyms Examples
No longer I don't eat meat anymore.
I no longer eat meat.
Nowadays People don't write letters by hand anymore.
People don't write letters by hand nowadays.
These days She doesn't go out much anymore.
She doesn't go out much these days.

Using the word “any more”

The word “any more” is used to determine the amount of something. Below, we will explain how it’s used in a sentence, and what it means.

“Any more” as a determiner

Any more is used to discuss quantities or amounts, often in questions or negative sentences, to inquire about or state that there is no additional amount of something.

Examples

  • Do we have any more bread in the pantry?
  • We don’t have any more milk in the fridge.
  • Are there any more tickets available for the concert?

“Any more” as an adverb

In the UK, “any more” can also function as an adverb with a meaning similar to “anymore,” particularly in some regional dialects. When used in this way, “any more” refers to the change over time, similar to the standard use of “anymore” to indicate that something no longer happens or is no longer the case. In British English, the usage of “anymore” might be considered nonstandard; however, it is becoming increasingly common, largely because it is widely used in American English.

Examples

  • I don’t live in that flat any more.
  • She doesn’t queue for the bus any more.
  • We don’t watch the telly any more.

Tips for using “any more“

Including synonyms for “any more” can improve writing, prevent redundancy, and add nuance. Here are alternatives with sample sentences focused on the American English usage of the word.

Synonyms Examples
Additional I don't need any more help.
I don't need additional help.
Extra Do you have any more tickets?
Do you have extra tickets?
Further We can't accept any more applications.
We can't accept further applications.

Test yourself!

Practice sheet

To improve your ability to differentiate between “anymore” and “any more,” fill in the blanks in the given sentences. The correct answers can be found on the second tab.

  1. She doesn’t live here ________.
  2. Do you have ________ questions?
  3. I don’t watch that show ________.
  4. Is there ________ cake left?
  5. They don’t sell those sneakers ________.
  6. I can’t find ________ examples in the book.
  7. Nobody goes to that café ________.
  8. Can you spare ________ time to help?
  9. We don’t see them around ________.
  10. Are there ________ copies of the report?
  1. She doesn’t live here anymore.
  2. Do you have any more questions?
  3. I don’t watch that show anymore.
  4. Is there any more cake left?
  5. They don’t sell those sneakers anymore.
  6. I can’t find any more examples in the book.
  7. Nobody goes to that café anymore.
  8. Can you spare any more time to help?
  9. We don’t see them around anymore.
  10. Are there any more copies of the report?
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FAQs

Both “anymore” and “any more” are correct, but their usage depends on context. “Anymore” is used as an adverb meaning “any longer” or “nowadays.” “Any more” refers to quantities, meaning “any additional amount.” Use “anymore” for time-related statements and “any more” when discussing quantities.

“Anymore” and “any longer” are both adverbs used to indicate that something no longer happens or is no longer the case from a certain point in time. The main difference is in their usage: “anymore” is commonly used in American English, while “any longer” can be used in both American and British English and is often considered slightly more formal. Both express the same idea of cessation of an action or state, but their placement in sentences can vary.

In British English (BE), “any more” is widely used. It is used for time, meaning “any longer” or “nowadays,” and also refers to quantities, meaning “any additional amount.”